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Wednesday, September 26, 201 2 



the 




INDEPENDENT VOICE FOR KANSAS STATE UNIVERSITY 





YOU DON'T 
KNOW HIM 



Obama's America: 



unfair tactics used 




Tomorrow: 

High: 76° F 
Low: 57 °F 




Friday: 

High: 71 °F 
Low: 54 °F 



03 



About those calls ... 

See what John Zetmeir 
has to say about the 
new NFL refs 



06 



Assess the upgrade 
Check Edge for the 
pros and cons of the 
new i Phone 5 



08 



Mean money myths 

Rumors about student 
spending couldn't be 
more wrong 



Gov. Brownback to students: 'Get involved' 




Jordan Wegele | Collegian 

Gov. Sam Brownback speaks to members of the KSU College Republicans in the Big 12 Room in the K-State 
Union. Brownback spoke vividly Tuesday evening on being a force for change in the world. 



Mark Joerling 
staff writer 

Returning to his alma mater, Gov. 
Sam Brownback spoke at the College 
Republicans meeting last night advo- 
cating for political involvement and 
giving advice to students. 

Before the meeting, as students 
began to fill the Big 12 Room in the 
K-State Student Union, Brownback, 
a Republican, went around the room 
introducing himself and making 
small talk until it was time for his 
speech. 

He began by discussing the foot- 
ball team's win over the University 
of Oklahoma and their potential for 
the rest of the season before moving 
into his political background, which 
included a stint as student body 
president while an undergraduate at 
K-State. 

Brownback covered the national 
presidential election, advocating for 
students to vote on Election Day, 



GOV | pg. 7 



Statewide forum on Kansas' wind energy potential starts today 



Mike Stanton 
staff writer 

The 2012 Kansas Statewide 
Wind Energy Forum will be 
held at the Hilton Garden Inn in 
Manhattan beginning today at 2 
p.m. and running through early 
afternoon on Friday. The forum 
will bring together experts on 
wind energy from throughout 
the state. It is funded by K-State, 
Wichita State University and 
the University of Kansas via 
their participation in the Kansas 
Board of Regents' Council of 
Chief Research Officers. 

James Guikema, associate 
vice president of research at In- 
state, will present an overview of 
the forum and its goals on Thurs- 
day morning. 

"The goal [of the forum] is 
to answer this question: What 
research projects that are 
novel, new and exciting can we 
propose in the arena of wind 
energy?" Guikema said. 

The state of Kansas receives 
a constant supply of wind blow- 
ing across the prairie, Guikema 
said, contributing to the state's 
vast potential for wind energy 
production — the second great- 
est in the United States behind 
Texas, according to a July report 



released by the U.S. Department 
of Energy's National Renewable 
Energy Laboratory. 

"The forum is basically one 
large discussion of very knowl- 
edgeable people," Guikema said, 
noting that attendees will in- 
clude researchers from K-State, 
WSU and KU as well as promi- 
nent professional wind energy 
experts from around the coun- 
try. 

A brochure advertising the 
forum states that its purpose is 
to "develop a roadmap" for uni- 
versities in Kansas to collabo- 
rate in "conducting wind energy 
research and development" 
and "educating and training 
the future Kansas wind energy 
workforce." 

The conference begins with 
registration today at 2 p.m. fol- 
lowed by a poster session mixer 
featuring exhibits from attending 
experts. Ron Trewyn, vice presi- 
dent of research at K-State, will 
deliver a welcome address on 
Thursday, after which attendees 
will split into several concurrent 
sessions, covering topics rang- 
ing from wind turbine research 
to the impact of wind energy on 
the community. Thursday after- 
noon, attendees will meet for an 
overview of the forum, in which 



they will evaluate and discuss 
the forum's progress. 

The forum will feature several 
prominent keynote speakers 
from the field of wind energy 
research. Fort Felker, director 
of the National Wind Technol- 
ogy Center, will speak Thursday 
morning on research being con- 
ducted at the Boulder facility. 

Steve Kelly, deputy secretary 
of the Kansas Department of 
Commerce, will deliver a speech 
entitled "Which Way is the Wind 
Blowing?" over lunch on Thurs- 
day. The day's events will end 
with a speech by Kimberly Svaty, 
owner of Gencur Svaty Public 
Affairs, entitled "Kansas Can 
Lead The Way." 

The forum will close on Friday 
after focus groups meet to sum- 
marize the forum and determine 
the next steps to be taken in ad- 
vancing research and productiv- 
ity in the field of wind energy. 



Jordan Wegele | Collegian 

The 2012 Kansas Statewide Wind 
Energy Forum will be held at the 
Hilton Garden Inn from Sept. 26- 
28. Kansas is estimated to possess 
the second greatest potential for 
wind energy in the U.S. behind 
Texas. 




K-State chemical engineering major grueling, but worth it 



Kelsie Johnson 
staff writer 

Chemical engineering at In- 
state is a branch of engineering 
that offers many opportunities, 
according to department head 
James Edgar. K-State offers four 
basic areas of study in chemi- 
cal engineering: research and 
development, design, process 
engineering and environmen- 
tal health and safely. 

Research and development 
consists of finding out how to 
produce valuable chemicals. 

'A valuable chemical can be 
a plastic or a gasoline, or it can 
be pharmaceuticals," Edgar 
said. 

The second basic area is 
design, in which students study 
methods of producing chemi- 
cals. Next, there is process en- 
gineering, which focuses on 
the production of chemicals in 
a plant setting. The fourth and 
final basic area of chemical 
engineering is environmental 
health and safely, which con- 
sists of ensuring compliance 
with regulations in offices and 
plants and making sure that 
everything is safe. 

There are a few paths within 
the chemical engineering 
degree. The technical path 
leads to becoming a subject 




Shelby Danielson | Collegian 

Michael Carlson and Charlie Fu, sophomores in chemical engineering, experiment with chemi- 
cal reactions for their ChemE Car club in Durland Hall Tuesday night. 



area expert. Most graduates 
tend to go into a more mana- 
gerial role where they can rise 
easily through the ranks of a 



company or plant. 

The Department of Chemi- 
cal Engineering has one of the 
better retention rates in the 



College of Engineering in spite 
of being, as Edgar called it, "a 
pretty homework-intensive 
discipline." 



"There are a lot of assign- 
ments given out [compared to] 
other engineering disciplines," 
he said. 

Logan Pyle, sophomore in 
chemical engineering, said the 
extra work is worth it. 

"I have a heavy workload. 
I'm taking 17 credit hours. I 
understand that we're training 
to become professionals, and 
that takes a lot of effort and 
time," Pyle said. 

According to K-State's 
Career and Employment Ser- 
vices, the average chemical 
engineering graduate from the 
2010-11 school year was of- 
fered a salary of about $67,000, 
while the highest salary offered 
a recent graduate was $87,000 
— more than any other major 
in the College of Engineering. 

Graduates can find them- 
selves anywhere in the world, 
but most stay close. Edgar 
said that about 80 percent of 
graduates from the chemical 
engineering program stay in 
Kansas and the surrounding 
states, although it is common 
for larger companies to move 
employees around in this field. 

"I'm looking at working with 
alternative energy, possibly 
in a different country," said 



CHEM | pg. 7 



K-State 
Proud wins 
national 
award 



Hana Johnson 
contributing writer 

Editor's Note: This article 
was completed as an assign- 
ment for a class in the A.Q. 
Miller School of Journalism 
and Mass Communications. 

Each year, many students 
benefit from the scholarships 
provided by a campaign with the 
slogan "Students Helping Stu- 
dents." Now, the K-State Proud 
Campaign, run by members of 
the KSU Student Foundation, is 
receiving a national honor. 

The "Outstanding Tried and 
True Program Award," which In- 
state Proud won, is presented by 

"K-State Proud 
has allowed more 
than 200 students 
to continue their 
education and their 
experience at 
Kansas State." 

Mindy Weixelman 
adviser to KSU Student 
Foundation and K-State 
Proud 



Affiliated Student Advancement 
Programs, a division of the non- 
profit Council for Advancement 
and Support of Education. CASE 
named K-State Proud one of the 
18 top student advancement 
programs in North America. 

"The award recognizes annual 
alumni and philanthropic pro- 
grams that are successful on col- 
lege campuses," said Kyle Reyn- 
olds, co-chair of K-State Proud 
and senior in mass communica- 
tions. "We first had to apply to 
our regional conference. When 
we won there, we took it to the 
national level." 

Reynolds said that the award 
also recognizes students across 
campus that have chosen to 
donate to the campaign and give 
back. 

"I'm most inspired by how 
passionate students are about 
making the K-State experience 
possible," said Mindy Weixel- 
man, adviser for the KSU Student 
Foundation and K-State Proud. 

K-State Proud is a fundraising 
campaign that encourages stu- 
dents to show their purple pride 
through philanthropy. Each year, 
students and faculty have several 
avenues through which they can 
donate money to the campaign. 

The money raised from T-shirt 
sales and other donations goes 
to establishing student oppor- 
tunity awards that assist K-State 
students with their financial 
needs. 

"The students applying for 
the student opportunity awards 
through K-State Proud often 
have exhausted all other forms 
of financial aid," Weixelman said. 
"K-State Proud has allowed more 
than 200 students to continue 
their education and their experi- 
ence at Kansas State." 

Within its first six years, the 
campaign has raised more than 
$550,000. These donations have 
benefitted many K-State stu- 
dents, allowing them to continue 
pursuing their education. 

"I have a friend who received 
an award from K-State Proud," 
said Faith Loepp, sophomore in 
kinesiology. "She was in danger 
of having to leave K-State. When 
she found out about the award, it 
was a great blessing to her." 

K-State Proud's vision is one 
that motivates students to con- 
tinue giving to students. 

"Part of the reason that the 
campaign has been so successful 
is because of the K-State family," 
Reynolds said. "Students care 
about other students, and this is 
the true definition of the family." 




NOW 

FORMING! 




INTRODUCING 8 WEEK 

BOWLING LEAGUES 



MONDAYS & TUESDAYS 
STARTS OCT.! 



UNION RECREATION 

LOWER LEVEL ■ K-STATE 5TJDE NT U NION 




union.k-state.edu/play ^ twitter.com/kssu01 (£, facebook.com/kstatestudentunion (£, 785-532-6562 



page 2 



the collegian 



Wednesday, September 26, 2012 



f Call 



776-5577 




ACROSS 



21 
24 



1 Express 

4 Lepre- 
chauns' 
dances 

8 Quest 

12 Area 51 
vessel 

13 Arm bone 

14 Sandwich 
treat 

15 Tatter 

16 "Consider 
it done" 

18 Pat down 
20 Charged 
bit 

Consider 
"Greet- 
ings, 
pardner" 
28 Nolan 
Ryan 
specialty 

32 Soft 
cheese 

33 Brewery 
product 

34 One's 
perfor- 
mances? 

36 401 (k) 
alterna- 
tive 

37 Peel 
39 "Don't 

sweat it" 
41 Trig ratio, 

for short 
43 "Peter 

Pan" dog 



44 Atmo- 
sphere 

46 Lowly 
soldier 

50 Super- 
easy 
decision 

55 Fish eggs 

56 British 
noble 

57 Leslie 
Caron 
role 

58 Pistol 

59 Salver 

60 Bit of 
plankton 
Conclu- 
sion 



61 



DOWN 



1 



Go from 
website 
to 

website 
In the 
distance 



3 Boo- 
Boo's 
mentor 

4 Promo- 
tional 
trips 

5 UN work- 
ers agcy. 

6 Econ. 
statistic 

7 Ganges 
garment 

8 Rub 
elbows 

9 Web 
address 

10 Born 

11 Male 
turkey 

17 Reaction 
to 

fireworks 
19 "Star 

Wars" 

initials 
22 Harrow 

rival 



Solution time: 21 mins. 



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Yesterday's answer 9-26 



23 Cren- 
shaw, 
for 
one 

25 Legal 
docu- 
ment 

26 Tragic 

27 Calendar 
period 

28 DEA 
agent 

29 Hodge- 
podge 

30 Coop 
group 

31 Actress 
Downey 

35 Punch- 
bowl 

contents, 

maybe 
38 With all 

one's 

heart 
40 Pitch 
42 Spy org. 
45 Latvia's 

capital 

47 Incite 

48 Proper 
subject? 

49 Incline 

50 Profit 

51 Rowing 
need 

52 Lingerie 
item 

53 Zero 

54 Early 
bird? 



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=, 







The Office of Student Activities and Services offers: 



Free Consumer & Tenant Advice 



The Consumer and Tenant Affairs Office 
provides information on landlord/tenant 
rights and responsibilities and aids in the 
resolution of consumer complaints 
regarding products and/or services. 
Brochures regarding landlord/tenant and 
consumer issues are also available. 




for more information visit the website at: 
http://www.ksu.edu/osas/cta.htm 



Consumer and Tenant Affairs Office 
Appointments Available Daily 

Call 532-6541 to make an appointment. 




9- 




Wednesday, September 26 
Show at 9pm 
Tickets Available Now 

785-776-9588 
23 1 7Tuttle Creek Boulevard 




Denver School of Nursing 



ACCREDITED BY: 



National League For Nursing 
Accrediting Commission 



BACHELOR OF SCIENCE NURSING 
ASSOCIATE DEGREE IN NURSING 



Just look at a small sample of employers that have hired our graduates: 
Sky Ridge Medical Center St. Anthony Central 
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Lutheran Medical Center Kaiser Permanente 
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Denver School of Nursing is an Accredited Member ACCSC, Denver School of 
Nursing programs are approved by the Colorado State Board of Nursing. 
NLNAC, 3343 Peachtree Road NE, Suite 850, Atlanta, Georgia 30326 
Phone: 404-975-5000 

FOR MORE INFORMATION 303-292-0015 
WWW.DENVERSCHOOLOFNURSING.EDU 



1401 19th STREET, DENVER, CO 80202 
(LOCATED 1 BLOCK FROM COORS FIELD) 



DSN is currently approved to train Veterans who qualify 
for VA Benefits! Financial aid available to those who qualify! 

FOR CONSUMER INFORMATION PLEASE GO TO: WWW.DENVERSCHO0L0FNURSING.EDU 



Logan's Run By Erin Logan 




CONTACT US 

DISPLAY ADS 785-532-6560 

advertising@kstatecollegian.com 

CLASSIFIED ADS, 785-532-6555 

classifieds@kstatecollegian.com 

NEWSROOM 785-532-6556 

news@new@kstatecollegian.com 

DELIVERY. 785-532-6555 

EDITORIAL BOARD 

Andy Rao Austin Nichols Tommy Theis 

editor-in-chief news editor photo editor 

Darrington Clark Mike Stanton Sarah Megee 

manasins editor asst. news editor social media and 

Laura Thacker Mark Kern video editor 

manasins copy sports editor Nathan Sh river 

chief Karen Ingram ad manaser 

Sarah edge editor Steve Wolgast 

Throckmorton Kelsey adviser 

desisn editor McClelland 

opinion editor 




collegian 

MEDIA GROUP 



LETTERS TO THE EDITOR 

The Collegian welcomes your letters. We reserve the right to edit 
submitted letters for clarity, accuracy, space and relevance. A letter 
intended for publication should be no longer than 350 words and must 
refer to an article that appeared in the Collegian within the last 10 
issues. It must include the author's first and last name, year in school 
and major. If you are a graduate of K-State, the letter should include 
your year(s) of graduation and must include the city and state where 
you live. For a letter to be considered, it must include a phone num- 
ber where you can be contacted. The number will not be published. 
Letters can be sent to letters@kstatec0Ue2ian.com 

Letters may be rejected if they contain abusive content, lack 
timeliness, contain vulgarity, profanity or falsehood, promote per- 
sonal and commercial announcements, repeat comments of letters 
printed in other issues or contain attachments. 

The Collegian does not publish open letters, third-party letters or 
letters that have been sent to other publications or people. 

CORRECTIONS 



If you see something that should be corrected or clarified, 
please call our managing editor Darrington Clark, at 785-532-6556, 
or email him at news@kstatecollegian.com. 



The Collegian, a student newspaper at Kansas State University, is 
published by Collegian Media Group. It is published weekdays during 
the school year and on Wednesdays during the summer. Periodi- 
cal postage is paid at Manhattan, KS. POSTAAASTER: Send address 
changes to Kedzie 103, Manhattan, KS 66506-7167. First copy free, 
additional copies 25 cents. [USPS 291 020] © Kansas State Collegian, 
2012 

All weather information courtesy of the National Weather Service. For 
up-to-date forecasts, visit nws.noaa.gov. 



THE BLOTTER 

ARREST REPORTS 

Monday, Sept. 24 ^ tance Rruce of 

Clay Center, Kan., was booked 



for probation violation. Bond 
was set at $2,000. 

Brandon John Flear, of 

the 1400 block of Cambridge 
Place, was booked for failure 



to appear. Bond was set at 
$3,000. 

Erik Ivan Urista, of the 
BLOTTER | pg. 7 




EVENING 




FALL 2012 



8-WEEK TERM I October 1 1 -December 7, 2012 



Accounting for Investing 
and Financing 

ACCTG 241 | 16162 

Arabic II 

ARAB 182 | 15562 

Public Speaking I 

COMM 106 | 15609 

Public Speaking II 

COMM 321 | 15611 

Intermediate 
Macroeconomics 

ECON 510 | 15607 



Intermediate 
Microeconomics 

ECON 520 1 15743 

Expository Writing II 

ENGL 200 | 15584 

The Short Story 
ENGL 253 | 15613 

Business Foundations 

GENBA 1 10 | 16484 

Earth in Action 

GEOL100| 15586 



2-WEEK OFFERINGS 

Intro to Information 
Technology 

CIS 101 I 15576 
October 16-27 

PREVIEW I Spring 201 3 

Accounting for Business 
Operations 

ACCTG 231 

Accounting for Investing and 
Financing 

ACCTG 241 

Arabic I 

ARAB 181 

Arabic II 

ARAB 182 

Biology of Aging 
BIOL 404 

Introduction to Information 
Technology 
CIS 101 

Introduction to 
Microcomputer Spreadsheet 
Applications 

CIS 102 

Introduction to 
Microcomputer Database 
Applications 

CIS 103 

Introduction to 
Microcomputer Word 
Processing Applications 

CIS 104 

Public Speaking I 

COMM 106 



Intro to Microcomputer 
Spreadsheet Applications 

CIS 102 | 15578 
October 30-November 8 



Public Speaking II 

COMM 321 

Communicating with 
Confidence 

COMM 450 

Principles of 
Macroeconomics 
ECON 110 

Principles of Microeconomics 
ECON 1 20 

Intermediate 
Macroeconomics 
ECON 510 

Intermediate 
Microeconomics 

ECON 520 

Early Childhood 

FSHS310 

Exceptional Development in 
Early Childhood 

FSHS 428 

Middle Childhood and 
Adolescence 

FSHS 506 

Human Development and 
Aging 

FSHS 510 

Core Conflict Resolution 

FSHS 531 



Geology Laboratory 

GEOL103| 15589 

History of the United States 

to 1877 

HIST 251 | 16671 

College Algebra 

MATH 100 | 15614 

General Calculus and 
Linear Algebra 

MATH 205 | 15593 

General Psychology 

PSYCH 110 | 15617 



Intro to Microcomputer 
Database Applications 

CIS 103 1 15579 
November 10-27 



Emergent Literacy 

FSHS 566 

Professional Seminar in FSHS 

FSHS 585 

Capstone Experience in 
Family Studies and Human 
Services 

FSHS 590 

Core Conflict Resolution 

FSHS 751 

Principles of Exercise Training 

KIN 398 

Business Law II 

MANGT 392 

College Algebra 
MATH 100 

Plane Trigonometry 

MATH 150 

General Calculus and Linear 
Algebra 

MATH 205 

Introduction to Moral 
Philosophy 

PHILO130 

General Psychology 

PSYCH 110 

Introduction to Sociology 

SOCIO 211 



Lifespan Personality 
Development 

PSYCH 520 | 16552 

Psychology of Organizations 

PSYCH 564 | 16551 

Intro to Sociology 
SOCIO 211 | 16157 

Global Problems 

SOCIO 363 I 16158 

Intro to Women's Studies 

WOMST105I 15655 



Intro to Microcomputer Word 
Processing Applications 

CIS 104 | 15580 
November 29-December 8 



Sociology of the Criminal 
Justice System 

SOCIO 361 

Police and Society 
SOCIO 362 

Social Organization 

SOCIO 440 

Introduction to Social 
Interaction 

SOCIO 450 

Business and Economic 
Statistics I 
STAT 350 

Business and Economic 
Statistics II 
STAT 351 

Introduction to Women's 
Studies 

WOMST105 




www.evening.k-state.edu 



Kansas State 

UNIVERSITY 



Division of 
Continuing Educa 




Wildcats remained focused despite bye week 




Collegian file photo 

Senior fullback Braden Wilson celebrates with the Wildcat fans in Norman, Okla., shortly after beating the Sooners 24-19 last Saturday. The Sooners' most recent defeat on home turf brings 
their overall record under head coach Bob Stoops to 78-4. 



Mark Kern 
sports editor 

After an incredible win like 
K-States last weekend at Oklaho- 
ma, it would be easy for a team to 
lose focus in its bye week. How- 
ever, head coach Bill Snyder said 
the Wildcats will use this week to 
get better as a team and will not 
allow complacency to kick in. 

"Well, the motivation has to be 
to get better, to become a better 
football team and to become 
a better player," Snyder said. 
"Maybe there are other motiva- 
tional aspects for each individual, 
but you would have to ask them. 
You know, I'd like for it to be pri- 
marily the fact that they would 
like to be a better football team." 

One key in the Wildcats' win 
over the Sooners was the per- 
formance by the defense. After 
facing criticism for their tack- 
ling two weeks ago in K-State's 
35-21 victory over North Texas 
two weeks ago, the defense re- 
sponded in a huge way. Besides 
limiting the Sooners to 19 points 



last Saturday, the defense also 
put a touchdown on the board. 
Senior linebacker larell Childs, 
one of the players responsible for 
the touchdown, said the defense 
takes pride in helping the offense 
put points on the board. 

"We take a lot of pride," Childs 
said, "and our coaches told us 
before the game that if we want to 
win this game, we need to score 
on the defensive side of the ball 
because Oklahoma has a great 
defense. So we took it upon our- 
selves to get into the end zone." 

With the win, K-State moved 
up to No. 7 in the country. Senior 
quarterback Collin Klein said 
that, while the ranking is awe- 
some, there is still a lot of work to 
be done. 

"There are a lot of people to 
thank for that and a lot of work 
and sacrifice that has been in- 
vested in this team, this program 
and in each other," Klein said. "A 
lot of seniors the last couple of 
years that are not on the team 
right now have contributed and 
laid a foundation that we are 



continuing to build here. We are 
moving in the right direction, 
but it is still just work and we are 
trying to get better." 

The Wildcats will be back in 
action in two weeks as they play 
host to the University of Kansas 
for the Governor's Cup. For many 
Wildcat players, it is the first time 
in their careers that they get to 
play the layhawks at home, since 
K-State has gone to Lawrence the 
past two years. 

Senior linebacker Arthur 
Brown understands that this is a 
big game for not only the team, 
but the community as well. 

"It is a great deal of pride, not 
only for us as a team, but for the 
community," Brown said. "We 
take great pride in this game, 
and there is a lot that goes into 
it, not only from our end, but the 
community's end as well. I know 
there is going to be a lot of energy 
and a lot of passion during that 
time." 

Kickoff is scheduled for 11:05 
a.m. Oct. 6 at Bill Snyder Family 
Stadium. 




Collegian file photo 

Senior quarterback Collin Klein takes a snap during the game against OU last 
Saturday in Noman, Okla. Klein ended the game with an average of 4.6 yards per 
carry as well as a touchdown. 



Replacement refs dominate headlines 



John Zetmeir 
staff writer 

Usually when fans think of 
the NFL, they think of their fa- 
vorite teams, pro bowl players 
and legendary coaches. This 
year, it's the referees who are 
stealing the headlines. 

NFL referees are currently 
in a lockout over salary nego- 
tiations, so the NFL has decided 
to use replacement referees 
until both sides come to a 
salary agreement. The replace- 
ment referees do not have the 
same training or experience as 
normal NFL referees. Most are 
regulars in the National Associa- 
tion of Intercollegiate Athletics 
and Division III college football. 

Numerous incidents have left 
fans, players and coaches upset 
with these replacement referees, 
but Monday night could easily 
become known as the straw that 
broke the camel's back. 

With time expiring, Seattle 
Seahawks quarterback Russell 
Wilson threw a Hail Mary pass 
into the end zone with his team 
down 7-12. What appeared to 
be an interception by Green Bay 
defensive back M.D. Jennings 
was ruled a touchdown recep- 
tion by Seahawks wide receiver 
Golden Tate. This gave the Se- 
ahawks a 13-12 lead with no 
time left, giving Seattle the win. 
NFL rules state that if an offen- 



sive and defensive player catch 
the ball simultaneously, the 
passing team gets possession. 
However, for everyone watch- 
ing the game, it was clear that it 
was not a simultaneous catch. 
In fact, it was nowhere near. Jen- 
nings clearly had the ball before 
Tate had even one hand on it. 
The play was reviewed, but the 
call was upheld and the the Se- 
ahawks win stood. The call left 
a feeling of anger and disgust 
with fans, players and just about 
anyone else who watches foot- 
ball in this country. 

"I simply just LOVE the NFL 
too much to see these mistakes. 
I'm sick like I just played for the 
Packers," said NBA superstar 
LeBron James last night on his 
Twitter account. 

Complaining about calls and 
referees is a tradition in sports, 
but the replacement referees 
have elevated this tradition 
to new heights. The only man 
who can fix the situation con- 
tinues to do nothing about it: 
Roger Goodell, commissioner 
of the NFL. It has become clear 
that real, experienced, profes- 
sional referees are considered 
a luxury. Goodell can still turn 
on his television set and watch 
two teams go to war with each 
other in front of a stadium full 
of fans with the knowledge that 
viewer ratings are still going to 
be high. By simply agreeing to 



the referees' reasonable salary 
demands, Goodell could end 
the debacle the NFL has already 
experienced only three weeks 
into the season. 

What's the worst that could 
happen? This is probably a 
question that Goodell asks him- 
self when pondering the referee 
situation. As we have already 
seen, teams can lose games that 
they do not deserve to lose, play- 
ers can get hurt and the overall 
integrity of the game can be tar- 
nished. 

However, at the end of the 
day, millions of fans all over 
the U.S are still going to turn on 
their televisions every Sunday, 
Monday and sometimes Thurs- 
day to watch the NFL. 

Goodell needs to realize 
that he is the commissioner 
of a multibillion-dollar indus- 
try that is being dominated by 
headlines about the referees. It 
is time to do the right thing and 
bring the referees back. Not only 
is he bringing back referees, he is 
bringing back the integrity that 
the NFL has worked so long and 
hard to build. It is simply embar- 
rassing to watch something as 
beautiful as professional football 
reduced to this. 

John Zetmeir is a sophomore 
in pre-journalism and mass 
communications. Please send 
comments to sports@kstatecol- 
lesian.com. 



H E K. O LJ our redesigned website 




kstatecollegian.com 



Two-minute drill 



Kara Peterson 
staff writer 

NFL 

John Abraham, defensive 
end for the Atlanta Falcons, was 
arrested Monday night and is 
being charged with obstruc- 
tion of police and obstruction 
of firefighters. After refusing to 
leave a taped-off scene where 
a woman was threatening 
to jump from a window of a 
hotel, he was taken to Fulton 
County Jail and released Tues- 
day morning, according to an 
ESPN news article published 
Tuesday. 

Abraham is the Falcons' top 
pass-rusher and leads the NFL 
in active career sacks at 1 14. 

The Falcons' running back, 
Michael Turner, was just arrest- 
ed last week for driving under 
the influence and was also 
charged with speeding. How- 
ever, he was allowed to play on 
Sunday in the Falcons' 27-3 win 
against the San Diego Chargers. 

Head coach Mike Smith 



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will address these matters in 
greater detail during his weekly 
news conference today but has 
announced that Abraham will 
play in Sunday's game against 
the Carolina Panthers. 

NCAAF 

The rivalry between Notre 
Dame and Michigan University 
football has been ongoing since 
2002 but is slowly coming to a 
halt. Notre Dame announced 
Sept. 12 that the university will 
be leaving the Big East and join- 
ing the Atlantic Coast Confer- 
ence in all sports except for 
football and hockey, a Tuesday 
ESPN.com article by Matt For- 
tuna stated. 

With this move comes the 
decision that Notre Dame foot- 
ball will play against five teams 
in the ACC, leaving no room 
in their schedule for the yearly 
Fighting Irish vs. Wolverines 
matchup. They will play each 
other in 2013 and 2014 for the 
last scheduled times. Michigan 
leads the series overall 23-16-1, 



but this past weekend the Irish 
defeated the Wolverines 13-6. 

NBA 

Chris Paul, point guard 
for the Los Angeles Clippers, 
is recovering just in time for 
the Clippers' first game of the 
season versus the Memphis 
Grizzlies on Oct. 30. 

Back in July, Paul tore a liga- 
ment in his right thumb during 
USAs training camp but re- 
fused to undergo surgery until 
after the Olympics. 

"Today was the first day they 
actually allowed me to shoot 
layups, so today was the best 
day ever," Paul said Tuesday ac- 
cording to an ESPNLosAnge- 
les. com article by Arash Marka- 
zi. Commenting on when he 
will play next, he said, "I hope I 
get a preseason game in before 
the season." 

He said is looking forward to 
making a run for the champi- 
onship title this year along with 
new additions Lamar Odom, 
Jamal Crawford and Grant Hill. 




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page 4 




the collegian 


Wednesday, September 26, 2012 




BLUESTEM BISTRO 

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Mon & Thurs: 10-6 . Tues & Wed: 8-4 



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OUTDOOR AND B I K E SP E C I AL I STS 

j Your community bike shop & outdoor store. 
Locally owned <& operated since 1975 



304 Poyntz Downtown Manhattan 785-539-5639 



www.thepathf i nder. net 



Local Growth and Wages 



Dave Colburn 
General manager at The 
Pathfinder ancTK-State 
Alum 

Are you a KSU student who is 
employed by a local business? 
How about your roommate or 
housemates? Thousands of your 
fellow students are employed 
by Manhattan owned and oper- 
ated stores, restaurants and ser- 
vice providers. These employ- 
ment opportunities are made 
possible by people patronizing 
these businesses. Are you one 
of those people? Are you spend- 
ing your dollars at businesses 
that hire K-Staters? 
The money earned by KSU 
students at their jobs here in 
Manhattan typically becomes 
the source of funding for their 
own living expenses here in 
Manhattan. Whether it is 
school supplies from Varney's, 
fruit and plants from Eastside 
Market, lunch at Vista or a late 
night slice from AJ's, dollars 
often support the work of other 
students in their jobs. These 
locally owned businesses also 
are often more intentional about 
spending a higher percentage 
of their income here in Manhat- 
tan, creating more jobs for your 
fellow Wildcats. That process 
repeats itself over and over 



again. Economists call this the 
"multiplier." 

Students have been a key part 
of our business model for over 
35 years. They bring a perspec- 
tive which is important to our 
successful relationship with 
our student customers. Their 
blend of maturity and youthful 
enthusiasm adds a unique vigor 
to our work as well as adding 
ongoing sensitivity to the issues 
students are facing at this tran- 
sitional time of their lives. Our 
store has employed over 200 
KSU students over the decades 
we have been in business and 
we have appreciated their work 
ethic and reliability. The strong 
support of our student custom- 
ers has provided the business 
needed to support our student 
work opportunities. 
As a student, one of the ben- 
efits of working for Manhat- 
tan centered employers is they 
understand the unique needs 
and challenges that students 
face: Papers are due, group 
projects need to be worked 
on outside of class, internship 
opportunities arise, there are 
post-season games to attend, 
etc. A smaller, more personal 
organization also tends to offer 
opportunities for students to 
get experience working "above 



their pay grade," meaning the 
opportunity to participate in 
discussions and decisions that 
large corporate operations will 
only make at a regional or 
national headquarters level. We 
consider the experiences our 
KSU student employees gain by 
working for us to be a unique 
additional value with lifetime 
benefits. Many of our former 
employees have told us over 
the years that what they learned 
at The Pathfinder has played 
a key role in their subsequent 
successes. Students who rec- 
ognize their work as personal 
growth opportunities can utilize 
this experience to strengthen 
their academic preparation for 
lifetime success. 
Locally owned businesses 
have invested themselves in 
this community and consider 
themselves a part of the K-State 
family. Students can participate 
in that investment by supporting 
those Manhattan businesses and 
the K-State students and alumni 
who work there. So ask your 
classmates where they work, 
then make an effort to frequent 
those places; or take the time 
to check out some of the stores, 
restaurants and services fea- 
tured on this page. Your support 
makes a difference! 



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Family Owned Thrift Store 



Interesting Antique/Vintage Items, 
Used Furniture, Home Decor, Albums, 
Books, Jewelry, Collectibles and 
So much more! 



308 Vattier Street Tues. thru Sat. 
(Across from McDonalds) 10:00 - 5:30pm 
(785)539-6300 




Houseplants 
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Pottery 

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Wednesday, September 26, 2012 



the collegk 



page 5 



RADINA'S 

coffeehouse & roastery 



Coffee so fresh... 

you mi glit 
have to slap it 



Manhattan's Favojyy 

Fruit Markets! **f> 




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616 N. 

Manhattan 
Ave. 



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2809 

Clafliii Rcl. 



KSU 

Leadership 
Studies 



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106 
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Eastside & Westside Markets 

East Hwy. 24 by Super-8 or W. K-18 by Briggs Auto 



Where has been your favorite place to work in Manhattan? 

Miguel Perez 

Meadowlark Hill Retirement Community! 
RCPD 

The Operation Greek Ofcs, love working in Riley Co with the greek/college 
community! 

Carla Hasenbank 

Brewer Motor Company at 6th andPoyntz working for Bob and Jacquie Brewer. 
Jenny Lilly 

Meadowlark Hills ... It's tough being a CNA but so rewarding when you help out the 
elderly!!! 

Kelly Connell Ribble 

Marlatt Elementary! 

Niki Peter 

Napa Auto Parts and Coco Bolo's 

Jamie Dysart 

Wildcat Pet Resort! 

Bern Pelletier 

tough, either working construction for the new basketball facility or working 
construction for the new football addition... 

Reed Pankratz 

Without a doubt, New Student Services in Anderson Hall. 

Neha Maheshwari 

call hall 

Taylor Applegate 

Target!!! 

President Kirk H. Schulz 

Anderson Hall! 





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page 6 



the collegian 



Wednesday, September 26, 2012 



i Phone 5 provokes 
question: is it worth it? 




1 $i 



courtesy photo 



iPhone 5 

Technology review by 
Chris Rathjen 

Apple officially unveiled 
the new iPhone 5 on Sept. 12, 
putting all speculation to rest. 
Several rumors about the 
design and price had been 
flying around for months. 

Some rumors said the 
iPhone would cost around 
$600 and have a totally 
redefined look. These rumors 
turned out to be false: a 16GB 
iPhone 5 costs $199 with 
a 2-year contract. Still, the 
question is, is it worth spend- 
ing $199 on? 

If you already have the 
iPhone 4 or 4S, then I'd say, 
"No." The changes are minute 
and not as life-changing as 
rumors made them out to 
be. You're better off waiting 
a year or so for the release of 
the iPhone 6 so that you don't 
spend $200 dollars on a simi- 
lar phone. That being said, if 
you have everything but the 
iPhone, or you're one of those 
pretentious types who has to 
have the next best thing, then 
the iPhone 5 is for you. 

So what can you expect in 
the new iPhone? As expected, 
it's thinner, longer and faster. 
It comes in the standard 
white and black; however, the 
edge for the black iPhone 5 
has been changed to a more 
sleek reflective black edge 
and is 18 percent thinner. 
While this may make the 
phone look cool, thin and 
sleek, you'll probably still 
need a bulky case to protect 
it. I have the iPhone 4S and 
am content enough with its 
size that I don't find a few 
inches life-changing. Also, 
while the colors may be styl- 
ish, color won't matter once 
you put a protective cover 
on it. 

Other differences between 
the iPhone 5 and the 4S 
include a faster processor 
with the new A6 chip, a .5 
inch larger display allowing 



a higher resolution for HD 
movies or games, an alumi- 
num back case and the new 
LTE connection. 

Apple reports that the 
new A6 processor is twice as 
fast as the A5 chip found in 
previous models, allowing 
quicker downloading of web 
browsers and graphics. More 
importantly, the A6 chip has 
a longer and more efficient 
battery life. This is the main 
advantage of buying the 
new model. Everyone likes a 
faster connection and longer 
battery life, and with this A6 
chip, they'll get just that. 

The new LTE is to the 
iPhone 5 as 4G is to the 
iPhone 4S. Basically, it's 
another type of internet con- 
nection, but only available 
in select cities (most likely 
highly populated areas.) 

Apple has also redesigned 
the ear buds and charger 
cable that come with the 
iPhone 5. The ear buds 
are more circular and are 
reported to enhance listening 
capabilities. Since the iPhone 
5 is sleeker, Apple had to 
create a new charger, thus 
leading Apple to create the 
lightning connector. The new 
connector is said to be more 
durable and is also revers- 
ible, which means no more 
late night struggles trying to 
charge your iPhone in the 
dark. The bad news about the 
charger cord is that it's only 
compatible with the iPhone 
5. However, you don't need 
to buy the iPhone to get the 
headphones — they are avail- 
able for separate purchase. 

While the decision is ulti- 
mately yours, my suggestion 
is to either buy the iPhone 
4 (which is practically the 
same phone) for free with an 
upgrade, or save your money 
and buy the next iPhone 
model in a year or so. 

Chris Rathjen is a sophomore in 
business administration. Please 
send comments to edge@ 
ksta tecollesian.com. 



Anti-Obama film unimpressive 




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"2016: Obama's 
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Movie review by Morgan 
Moxley 

In the controversial 
documentary "2016: 
Obama's America," Dinesh 
D'Souza attempts to predict 
where President Barack 
Obama will take America 
by the year 20 1 6 if he wins 
a second term. D'Souza 
analyzes Obama's past in 
order to uncover who he 
is, what he stands for and 
where he could, potentially, 
lead America. 



I don't think D'Souza 
succeeds in reeling in his 
audience. The documentary 
was very boring. There were 
some informative points 
about Obama that I was un- 
aware of, but I wasn't very 
impressed. At one point in 
the film, D'Souza inter- 
views Obama's half-brother, 
George Obama, and, when 
he doesn't get the answers 
he wants, begins pestering 
him in an attempt to paint 
Obama as the "bad guy." 

One topic D'Souza 
focused on was Obama's 
book, "Dreams from My 
Father." He spends an 
inordinate amount of 
time trying to determine 
why it is titled "Dreams 



from My Father" and not 
"Dreams of My Father," a 
seemingly inconsequential 
detail. D'Souza argues that 
Obama's presidency is an 
expression of of his father's 
political beliefs. However, 
the problem I have with 
this is that Obama's father 
left his wife and son when 
Obama was 2 years old. 
Obama's father only visited 
him once before he passed 
away in a car crash. 

When I walked into the 
theater, I was ready to see 
a great documentary that 
had already stirred up some 
controversy for Obama and 
D'Souza. However, the only 
thing I found entertaining 
was seeing D'Souza travel to 



courtesy photo 

different countries depict- 
ing Obama's past. But, even 
then, there was a point at 
which D'Souza tried to talk 
to Obama's grandmother 
and the cops were called on 
him. I wouldn't go see this 
movie a second time, but 
if you want to know about 
D'Souza's personal opinion 
of our president and where 
he thinks Obama's presi- 
dency is headed, go watch 
it. As the poster said, "Love 
him or hate him, you don't 
know him." I give this docu- 
mentary 3 out of 5 stars. 

Morgan Moxley is a sophomore 
in pre-journalism and mass 
communications. Please send 
comments to edse@kstatecol- 
legian.com. 



Nas' new album 'Life is Good' his best in years, includes Amy Winehouse duet 



_ 

Y Jt 




courtesy photo 



"Life Is Good" 

Album review by Chris Harrison 

Nas has come a long way in 
his career with the release of 
his latest album, "Life is Good." 
Throughout the years, he's had to 
deal with the lofty expectations 
set by his 1994 debut album, 
"Illmatic," which is widely re- 
garded as one of the best hip-hop 
albums of all time. 

The success of his debut led 
to a self-indulgent middle stage 
of his career that left fans of his 
classics disappointed. However, 
since his "Distant Relatives" col- 
laboration with Damian Marley, 
Nas seems to have found new 
energy. 

One listen to the last verse on 
the third track, 'A Queens Story," 
reveals a focus that hasn't been 
seen since his debut. It sets the 
tone for the entire album and 
sends the message that yes, Nas 
has definitely returned to form. 
This focus, along with the stron- 
gest production he's rapped over 
in years, has resulted in the best 
album he's put out in years. 

'Accident Murderers" features 
frequent collaborator Rick Ross, 
whom, despite not seeming to 
know what the song is about, 
turns in a strong verse over a 
lavish instrumental. "The Black 



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Bond," featured on the deluxe 
edition, would sound right at 
home in a 007 flick, with its 
haunting strings, slinking bass 
line and horns. 

Nas uses the No LD.-produced 
"Loco-Motive" as a lyrical show- 
case, bragging and boasting over 
a hard-driving beat. "Nasty," the 
albums first single, shows Nas 
at the peak of his abilities and 
he absolutely dismantles the 
instrumental. 

These are all great, however, 
the strongest cuts on the whole 
album are the more personal 
songs. "Bye Baby" addresses his 
much-publicized divorce with 
Kelis, whose wedding dress is 
draped over Nas knee on the 
album cover, and "Daughters" 
details his struggle to raise a 
teenage daughter while dealing 
with his own past as a ladykiller, 
which he approaches with brutal 
honesty. 

And lastly, "Cherry Wine," 
featuring the late Amy Wine- 
house (recorded during a 2008 
studio session), is one of the 
best songs to come out this year. 
Its a very mature duet about 



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finding the perfect partner. Its 
far removed from older songs, 
where Nas looked to dazzle girls 
with expensive jewelry. Nas now 
finds himself looking for some- 
one who "ain't afraid of life, not 
easily impressed with the rich 
and famous life." Nas manages 
to pull off genuine sensitivity 
without even a hint of corniness, 
and Winehouse's vocals are every 
bit as soulful as they were on her 
acclaimed solo work. 

"Life is Good" isn't without 
its blemishes, though. "You 
Wouldn't Understand" has a great 
throwback instrumental but the 
song is ultimately forgettable 
and "Back When" is mediocre. 
"Summer on Smash," featuring 
Swizz Beatz, is a mess and the 
sound quickly becomes grating. 

However, none of that is 
enough to hold the album back. 
Nas has shown tremendous 
growth as an artist, crafting an 
album that easily stands up to his 
best work. 41/2 out of 5 stars. 

Chris Harrison is a senior in 
marketing. Please send comments 
to edge@kstatec0lle3ian.com. 



got memories? 

we do. 



ROYAL 

PURPLE 

YEAR 
BOOK 



103 kedzie hall 
785-532-6555 
royalpurple.ksu.edu 



Wednesday, September 26, 2012 



the collegian 



page 7 



BLOTTER | 

Riley County 

arrest 

reports 

Continued from page 2w 

800 block of Fair Lane, was 
booked for failure to appear and 
probation violation. Bond was 
set at $10/750. 

Robert Lee Black, of 

Chapman, Kan., was booked for 
domestic battery, violation of 
protection orders, criminal re- 
straint and misdemeanor theft. 
Bond was set at $ 1,500. 

Carolee Anne Jensen, of 

the 3200 block of Shady Valley 
Drive, was booked for failure to 
appear. Bond was set at $1,500. 

Guillermo Med ran o 

Torres, of the 2100 block of 
Spruce Place, was booked for 
no driver's license. Bond was set 
at $500. 

Tuesday, Sept. 25 

Brandon VI bin Vaverka, 

of the 1900 block of Hunting 
Avenue, was booked for driving 
under the influence. Bond was 
set at $750. 

Compiled by Katie Goerl 



GOV | Visit boosts turnout at College Republicans meeting 



Continued from page 1 

before giving more specific 
political advice. 

"Get involved with a cam- 
paign, find someone you truly 
philosophically believe in and 
help," Brownback said during 
his speech. "Campaigns are 
always looking for people." 

Brownback touched on his 
intern program as a great way 
to get involved before chal- 
lenging students to consider 
running for public office. 

"[Public service] can be 
very rewarding, knowing that 
you are making a difference," 
Brownback said. "I have 
never met anyone in politics 
who truly didn't want to help. 



We may have different view- 
points, but everyone has a 
good heart." 

Brownback urged students 
to act upon their ideas and 
make them a reality, then 
opened the floor to questions 
from students. 

Ashton Archer, president 
of the College Republicans 
and senior in mechanical 
engineering, approached 
Brownback about a variety 
of topics, one of which was 
current political changes in 
Kansas. 

"There is a lot changing in 
the state, and I think it's im- 
portant for our members to 
meet the people responsible 
for making these policies," 



Archer said. "It helps putting 
a face to a name." 

In Archer's eyes, the meet- 
ing was a success. 

"I thought it was a big suc- 
cess," Archer said. "I think the 
members really enjoyed the 
personal touch when he went 
around introducing himself 
before the meeting. It was a 
great opportunity for us to 
meet him, and he enjoyed 
meeting us." 

Approximately 60 stu- 
dents attended the speech 
and several had questions for 
Brownback. Students' ques- 
tions ranged from the topics 
of education funding and 
health care reform to why he 
became a politician and what 



his political goals as governor 
are, until Brownback had to 
leave due to time constraints. 

According to Archer, more 
people attended the speech 
than a typical meeting, and 
she hoped the event would 
spur more people to join the 
College Republicans. 

"Having Brownback speak 
is a good recruitment guide, 
but we really want people to 
get involved with the club," 
Archer said. 

Not everyone who attend- 
ed identified as a Republican. 
Grant Wasserstrom, junior 
in business administration, 
attended the meeting but 
claims allegiance to neither 
party. 



"[Brownback] has a very 
imaginative way of speak- 
ing. He took simple points 
and depicted them very viv- 
idly," Wasserstrom said. "I am 
trying to get more involved on 
campus, and he showed that 
you can easily get involved if 
you want to." 

Though Wasserstrom said 
he will not be attending next 
week, he was glad he attend- 
ed Tuesdays meeting, saying 
he got a lot out of Brown- 
back's speech. 

Brownback ended by high- 
lighting once again the major 
theme of his speech: "Find 
your interest, get involved 
and stay involved, whatever it 
may be." 



CHEM | Students: program 
prepares for 'real world 7 



up-to-date 

(g)kstatecollegian 



Continued from page 1 



Daniel Dorsett, sophomore in 
chemical engineering. 

Students said K-State's chemi- 
cal engineering department suc- 
ceeds in preparing students for 
life after graduation. 

"K-State gives me good knowl- 
edge to prepare for the future," 
said Bettina Moncayo, junior in 
chemical engineering. 

Pyle said his work at K-State 
would pay off in the end. 

"I feel very prepared. I think 
the curriculum laid out by the 
chemical engineering professors 
prepares me for real world jobs 
right out of college," Pyle said. 



A significant amount of money 
goes into chemical engineer- 
ing's material research each year, 
much of it related to agriculture. 
For example, Vikas Berry, Wil- 
liam H. Honstead professor of 
chemical engineering, is experi- 
menting with nanotechnology in 
materials. 

Engineering is a major that 
takes a lot of time and effort, ac- 
cording to Edgar. It seems the 
payoff of helping keep the world 
safe is worth the tremendous 
amount of homework and assign- 
ments to K-State's chemical engi- 
neering majors. 

"I think I'll enjoy the end result 
more than the work right now," 
Moncayo said. 



Polo party 



• 



Evert Nelson | Collegian 

Floating around in a pool in the natatorium Tuesday night, the K-State water polo 
team takes time to practice for their next tournament. 



To place an advertisement c 

785-532-6555 




assifiaris 



NEW HOME 



| Stadium £ Aggieville/Downtown 

^ West Campus ^ East Campus 
F I N U E R For details see map. A Anderson/Seth Child ic Close to town 



NEW HOME FINDER 

Let us help you choose your neighborhood. 
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an area of town. _ , L _, 
Kimball Ave ■ l,. c i I Utf <nft 



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Bulletin Board 



my 

Announcements 



LEARN TO FLY! K- 
State Flying Club has 
three airplanes and low- 
est rates. Call 785-562- 
6909 or visit www.ksu.- 
edu/ksfc. 




FOUR-BEDROOM, 
TWO bath house. Nice, 
large. Washer/ dryer, 
central air. Available im- 
mediately. 785-317- 
7713 



Luxury 2 Bedroom Apts. 
Close to Campus! 
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1131 BERTRAND 
916 KEARNEY 



IPebblebrook Apts. 
Cambridge Sq. Apts 
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AG MALES seek room- 
mates for one of four- 
bedrooms, newer 
home, near Casement 
and Butterfield. No 
smoking. Furnished, all 
utilities paid. $400/ 
month. Ron 913-269- 
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MANHATTAN CITY Or- 
dinance 4814 assures 
every person equal 
opportunity in hous- 
ing without distinc- 
tion on account of 
race, sex, familial sta- 
tus, military status, 
disability, religion, 
age, color, national 
origin or ancestry. Vio- 
lations should be re- 
ported to the Director 
of Human Resources 
at City Hall, 785-587- 
2440. 




537-9064 

www.rentHRC.com 






Service Directory 





MANHATTAN CITY Or- 
dinance 4814 assures 
every person equal 
opportunity in hous- 
ing without distinc- 
tion on account of 
race, sex, familial sta- 
tus, military status, 
disability, religion, 
age, color, national 
origin or ancestry. Vio- 
lations should be re- 
ported to the Director 
of Human Resources 
at City Hall, 785-587- 
2440. 



FOUR-BEDROOM, 
TWO bath. Available 
ASAP. $960/ month. 
Two-bedroom, two 
bath. Available ASAP. 
$695/ month. Close to 
K-State Football. Pool, 
on-site laundry. 2420 
Greenbriar Drive. (785) 
537-7007." 



ONE-BEDROOM 
CLOSE to campus. Mid- 
September lease. Holly, 
785-313-3136. 



TWO-BEDROOM; 
$820. Three-bedroom; 
$960. Newer westside 
apartment. 785-341- 
4024 or 785-313-4524. 
Beechwoodmanhattan.- 
com. 



LOOKING FOR some- 
one for yardwork, mow- 
ing, trimming, fall clean 
up. $10/ hour. 
No tools needed. 785- 
313-0372. 




Employment/Careers 




I-HESMNT 



Kansas State 
Collegian 

103 Kedzie 
785.532.6555 



THE COLLEGIAN can- 
not verify the financial 
potential of advertise- 
ments in the Employ- 
ment/ Opportunities 
classifications. Read- 
ers are advised to ap- 
proach any such busi- 
ness opportunity with 
reasonable caution. 
The Collegian urges 
our readers to contact 
the Better Business 
Bureau, 501 SE Jeffer- 
son, Topeka, KS 
66607-1190. 785-232- 
0454. 



BUS MECHANIC. The 
School Bus Mechanic 
will assist in keeping 
the district's buses in 
such a state of operat- 
ing excellence. Full- 
time employment (work- 
ing 12 months). Salary 
is $11.00/ hour. All ap- 
plicants may now apply 
at http://alioemployee.- 
usd383.org/Applicant- 
Portal/search.php or 
visit Manhattan-Ogden 
USD 383, 2031 Poyntz 
Ave., Manhattan, KS 
66502. 785-587-2000 E.- 
O.E.* 

$BARTENDING!$ $300 
a day potential. No ex- 
perience necessary. 
Training provided. Call 
800-965-6520 exten- 
sion 144. 

COMPLETE OUT- 
DOORS, Inc. Hiring full/ 
part-time positions for 
landscape and irriga- 
tion. Call 785-776-1930 
to receive an applica- 
tion. 

NUTRITION ASSIS- 
TANT. Full-time and 
part-time opportunities 
at Mercy Regional 
Health Center! We are 
looking for friendly, en- 
ergetic, service-ori- 
ented applicants. Flexi- 
ble hours, paid time off, 
tuition reimbursement! 
To apply visit mercyre- 
gional.org EOE 



APPLICATION DEVEL- 
OPER. KSU Housing 
and Dining Services 
seeks student applica- 
tion developers to work 
as part of the HDS 
Apps Team. Prefer pro- 
gramming experience 
in PHP or VB.Net, a de- 
sire to learn and meet a 
challenge. Preference 
given to applicants with 
Linux experience and 
undergraduates who 
are computer science 
or MIS majors. Under- 
graduates majoring in 
other areas with experi- 
ence in the technolo- 
gies mentioned are en- 
couraged to apply. 
Must be able to work a 
minimum of 12 hours 
per week between 8a.m.- 
- 5p.m., Monday- Fri- 
day. Starts $10.00/ 
hour. Work study not re- 
quired. Details at: http:- 
//housing.k-state.edu/re- 
sources/employments/s- 
tudentinfotech/. 
AA/EOE. 

PART-TIME LA- 
BORER, can work 
Tuesday and Thursday 
mornings or afternoons. 
785-317-7713. 



DO YOU commute from 
Wamego or close by to 
K-State? Earn extra 
money delivering the 
Collegian. Call 785-532- 
071 9 for details. 




LABORERS NEEDED. 
Howe Landscape Inc is 
currently seeking labor- 
ers for several of our 
divisions. This is for full- 
time and part-time help, 
with flexible schedules 
for students, preferably 
four-hour blocks of 
time. Applicants must 
be 18 years of age, 
have a valid driver's li- 
cense and pass a pre- 
employment drug test. 
Apply three ways, in 
person Monday- Friday, 
8a.m.- 5p.m. at 12780 
Madison Rd in Riley; 
call 785-776-1697 to ob- 
tain an application; or e- 
mail us at 

as kh owe® ho we land- 
scape. com. You may 
also visit our website, 
www.howelandscape.- 

com. 

NEED PART-TIME help 
with clerical work in a lo- 
cal office. Please send 
your resume to 785- 
565-0954. 

STUDENTPAYOUTS.- 
COM. PAID survey tak- 
ers needed in Manhat- 
tan. 100% free to join. 
Click on surveys. 

COOKS NEEDED. Fast- 
paced work environ- 
ment. Inquire in person. 
Must have proper dress 
and interview etiquette. 
Also must have refer- 
ences. Houlahans, 
1641 Anderson. 785- 
776-5909* 



LOOKING FOR a tutor 
to help with Physics 
and U.S. History for a 
junior in high school. 
Please call 617-640- 
0658. 

LOOKING FOR a ca- 
reer? Howe Landscape 
Inc is looking to hire a 
maintenance shop me- 
chanic/ foreman 
with small engine and 
lawn mower mechani- 
cal abilities. Job duties 
to include mower ser- 
vice and repair, perform- 
ing minor truck/ trailer 
service and repair, 
overseeing all other 
shop equipment, inven- 
tory and supplies. Ap- 
plicants must be 18 
years of age, have a 
valid driver's license 
and pass a pre-employ- 
ment drug test. Previ- 
ous shop experience 
and mechanical back- 
ground required. Must 
be self organized, moti- 
vated and able to diag- 
nose and complete re- 
pairs in a timely man- 
ner. Hours for position 
will be variable, with op- 
tion for being part-time 
or possibly a full-time 
employee, based on ap- 
plicant's availability. 
Pay dependent upon 
knowledge, experience, 
and hours available. 
Apply three ways, in 
person Monday- Friday 
at 12780 Madison Rd 
in Riley; call 785-776- 
1697 to obtain an appli- 
cation; or e-mail us at 
as kh owe @ ho we land- 
scape. com. You may 
also visit our website, 
http://www.howe land- 
scape. com. 



MILL CREEK Valley 
USD 329 has an open- 
ing for a Junior High 
Boys Basketball coach 
for the 2012-13 school 
year at Mill Creek Val- 
ley Jr. High in Paxico. 
Those interested 
should complete an ap- 
plication at the USD 
329 office, 213 E 9th, 
Alma or online at www.- 
usd329.com. Deadline 
to apply September 27, 
2012. 



THE COLLEGIAN can- 
not verify the financial 
potential of advertise- 
ments in the Employ- 
ment/ Opportunities 
classifications. Read- 
ers are advised to ap- 
proach any such busi- 
ness opportunity with 
reasonable caution. 
The Collegian urges 
our readers to contact 
the Better Business \f 
Bureau, 501 SE Jeffer- r 
son, Topeka, KS 
66607-1190. 785-232- 
0454. 



Need a 
New 
Place 

to Live? 



Check the 
Classifieds! 



Travel/Trips 



[o/llW 
Tour Packages 



COLLEGE SKI & BOARD WEEK 



20 Mountains. 5 Resorts. 1 Price. 



JANUARY 
3-8,2013 



WWW.UBSKI.COM 

1-800-SKI-WILD • 1-800-754-9453 




VEGETABLES, FLOW- 
ERS, fruits and more. 
Advertise your bounty 
here! 



Pregnancy 
Testing Center 

539-3338 

www.PTCkansas.com 



Bulletin Board Service Directory 



010-Announcements 
020-Lost and Found 
030-Post A Note 
040-Meetings/Events 
050-Parties-n-More 
060-Greek Affairs 



Housing/Real Estate 



101 -Rentals Wanted 
105-Rent-Apt. Furnished 
110-Rent-Apt. Unfurnished 
1 1 5-Rooms Available 
117-Rent-Duplexes 
120-Rent-Houses 
125-Sale-Houses 
130-Rent-Mobile Homes 
135-Sale-Mobile Homes 
140-Rent-Garages 
145-Roommate Wanted 
150-Sublease 
155-Stable/Pasture 
160-Office Space 
165-Storage Space 



205-Tutor 

220-Weight Loss & Nutrition 
225-Pregnancy Testing 
230-Lawn Care 
235-Child Care 
240-Musicians/DJs 
245-Pet/Livestock Services 
250-Automotive Repair 
255-Other Services 




Employment/Careers 



310-Help Wanted 
320-Volunteers Needed 
330-Business Opportunities 
340-Fundraisers/Scholarships 



Open Market 



405-Wanted to Buy 
410-ltems for Sale 
415-Furniture to Buy/Sell 
420-Ga rage/Yard Sales 
430-Antiques 
435-Computers 
445-Music Instruments 
450-Pets/Livestock & Supplies 
455-Sporting Equipment 
460-Electronic Equipment 
465-Tickets to Buy/Sell 




610-Tour Packages 
630-Spring Break 



The classified ads are 
arranged by category 
and sub-category. 
All categories are 
marked by one of the 
large icons, and sub- 
categories are 
preceded by a number 
designation. 



CALL 785-532-6555 

E-mail 

classifieds@kstatecollegian.com 



Deadlines 



Classified ads must be placed by 
noon the day before you want 
your ad to run. Classified display 
ads must be placed by 4 p.m. two 
working days prior to the date 
you want your ad to run. 



Place An Ad 



Go to Kedzie 103 (across 
from the K-State Student Union.) 
Office hours are 
Monday through Friday 8 a.m.-5 p.m. 



Classified Rates 



Transportation 



510-Automobiles 

520-Bicycles 

530-Motorcycles 



1 DAY - $14.95 
for 20 words or less 

20C per word for each word over 20 

2 DAYS -$16.95 
for 20 words or less 

25<Z per word for each word over 20 

3 DAYS -$19.95 
for 20 words or less 

30c per word for each word over 20 



4 DAYS - $22.50 
for 20 words or less 

35c per word for each word over 20 

5 DAYS - $25.05 
for 20 words or less 

40c per word for each word over 20 



(consecutive day rate) 



Concept is SudoKu 



By Dave Green 



8 



8 



[Difficulty Level ★★★★ 



Answer to the 
last Sudoku. 



6 5 4 



7 9 



3 8 



8 6 1 
5 9 3 
7 4 2 



9 2 8 



3 6 



5 1 6 



) "Real Options, Real Help, Real Hope" 
Free pregnancy testing 
Totally confidential service 
Same day results 
Call for appointment 
Mon.-Fri. 9 a.m. -5 p.m. 
Across from campus in Anderson Village 



page 8 



the collegian 



Wednesday, September 26, 2012 



Powereafl 



■Financial 

Counseling 



FREE ASSISTANCE FOR K-STATE STUDENTS 




REQUEST AN APPOINTMENT 

ATwww.k-state.edu/pfc 



809 K-State Student Union 
785.532.2889 

powercatfinancial@k-state.edu 



4 common misconceptions about student finances 




Andy Rao 



Despite popular belief, managing 
your money is not rocket science. 
Many of us tend to limit ourselves 
because people have told us that 
it is OK, as college students, not to 
have our finances in order. 

"Oh, I'm just a poor college stu- 
dent" is an excuse we all hear (and 
probably have all used ourselves at 
some point) to justify bad spending 
and saving habits. 

However, adhering to this men- 
tality will only hold you back from 
achieving financial success. Having 
monetary goals at this time in your 
life is extremely important, espe- 
cially when you have burdensome 
expenses like tuition and books, as 
well as smaller investments such as 
club dues. 

Despite what you hear, being a 
college student does not necessarily 
mean that you have to choose be- 
tween paying for school and eating 



meals. If you plan out your expenses 
and set financial goals for yourself, 
you should be able to live comfort- 
ably — even while in college. 

Here are four common miscon- 
ceptions that students often hear 
about student finances. 

1 College students can't 
■ make money. 

This statement is the furthest 
thing from the truth. Making money 
is not necessarily about having a 
degree and working a 9-to-5 job. 

Creating sources of income 
for yourself is a matter of being 
opportunistic and thinking with a 
business mind. Being aware of your 
surroundings and actively seeking 
out ways to make money is crucial. 
Opportunity does not always come 
knocking at your door; sometimes 
you have to go hunt it down. 

A college campus is the perfect 
environment to combine an edu- 
cational experience with making a 
profit. The trick is to make sure that 
you are constantly looking for op- 
portunities and meeting the needs 
of others. 

Whether this comes in the form 
of working an on-campus job, start- 



ing a simple tutoring business or 
looking for ways to match your skill 
set with a community need, you can 
definitely make a buck or two in the 
process. 

2 College students will 
■ inevitably accumulate too 
much debt. 

While this is sometimes the case, 
it is important to remember that 
you don't have to be neck-deep in 
student loans when you graduate. 

At the end of the day, the bottom 
line of finances is input and output; 
that is, how much money do you 
bring in and how much do you 
spend? If you are constantly ending 
up in the red, you have two choices: 
cut down on expenses or increase 
your earning capacity and bring in 
more money. 

Also, be on the lookout for free 
money; scholarships, grants and 
various other forms of financial 
awards are always available to 
students. Don't rob yourself of an 
opportunity to significantly reduce 
your monetary obligations. 

By using budgeting techniques 
and constantly monitoring their 
finances, students can see where 



they spend money and whether 
or not they need to increase their 



3 College students don't 
■ care about budgeting. 

I have personally witnessed 
students in tears because they 
don't know what to do about their 
financial situation. Large amounts 
of loans, credit card debts and other 
financial troubles can set students 
back years after graduation. 

It's not that students don't care. 
Many of us just don't know where 
to go to get assistance because, for 
a lot of us, this is the first time in our 
lives that we are in charge of our 
own money situation. 

The best thing students can do to 
avoid these problems is to educate 
themselves. Learning things like 
how loans are structured and even 
looking ahead to potential career 
opportunities can help you add 
stability to your future. 

Read and inform yourself about 
your surroundings. What goes on 
in the world affects you every day; 
remember, it is better to make the 
effort to stay up to date and aware 
of your surroundings than to be 



blindsided later on. 

4 There is no way for stu- 
■ dents to understand how 
to manage money until they 
enter the "real world." 

Sure, some students still rely on 
their parents to do the majority of 
their money managing for them, 
but how will you ever learn if you 
don't take responsibility for your 
own finances? 

The best thing that you can do 
for yourself is to take over your own 
monetary situation. This will force 
you to learn how to budget, pay 
your own bills and keep track of 
where you stand financially. 

If you have a checking account 
or a credit card, learn how to watch 
your inflow and outflow. If you have 
student loans, start thinking about 
what you are going to do to pay 
them back. 

Be in the driver's seat, because 
you won't truly learn what it means 
to manage your own money until 
you do it yourself. 

Andy Rao is a junior in finance and 
accounting. Please send comments to 
news@ks ta tecollegian . com . 




Defense Wareham Opera 

Class At The KSU House 
Rec Center 



Business beat: Google stock sky-high, USPS in debt 



Darrington Clark 
managing editor 



Google stock hits all-time 
high, beating Apple record 

Google reached a record 
$750.04 per share Tuesday 
before closing at $749.38. 

This price tops Google's 
previous record of $747.24 
and Apple's current price of 
$707.50, even amid record 
iPhone sales. 

According to a Tuesday 
CNN article, Google's stock 
has risen 16 percent so far 
this year, thanks both to the 
search engine and to Google's 
work with the Android plat- 
form, which has claimed 68 
percent of the global smart- 
phone market. 

Wall Street analysts expect 



the stock to climb even higher 
before reaching its peak. 

U.S. Postal Service faces 
second major payment 
default 

The U.S. Postal Service will 
default on a $5.6 billion pay- 
ment to fund health care re- 
tirees Sunday. According to 
an article published by CNN 
Money on Tuesday, the Postal 
Service does not have the 
money to make this payment. 

The last time a major pay- 
ment defaulted was Aug. 1 of 
this year. Continued default 
payments will soon result in 
drastic cuts to the system due 
to lower pay for carriers and 
subcontractors. The Postal 
Service stated that the default 
will not affect the salaries of 
workers. 



Discover to refund $200 
million to customers for 
fraudulent advertising 

The Discover company is 
refunding $200 million to 3.5 
million customers for pushing 
false payment protection and 
credit card monitoring. 

The Consumer Financial 
Protection Bureau and the 
FDIC announced Tuesday 
that Discover would be re- 
funding customers, in addi- 
tion to paying a $14 million 
fine, according to an article 
published by Forbes. Refunds 
will be given to customers 
who bought one of these 
products from December 
2007 to August 2011. 

Last fuly, Capital One paid 
$150 million to 2 million cus- 
tomers for selling the same 
kind of false products. 



[Pip©© @®m@c^pg 

with singer/songwriter 

Marc Scibilia 




© JpDQQ 



"5 J? • | 
"1= o LJ 



Li 



8-2 



Jllaua life 

EDCEP 103 | Class #16056 | ONLINE 

Earn 3 credits in 
only EIGHT WEEKS 

Class dates: OCTOBER 15 - DECEMBER 7 

View class topics at www.dce.k-state.edu/courses/collegelife 
ENROLL NOW at https://isisl-state.edu 




&*) 6640 



1-800-622-2KSU (2578) 
i nf ormati on dce@ k- state, ed u 



Google Fiber Internet ser- 
vice to be installed near 
Kansas City next month 

The Google Fiber Internet 
service will begin installation 
in Kansas City next month. 
Success in that area will de- 
termine whether or not the 
service will spread into other 
areas of Missouri and Kansas. 

According the Kansas City 
Star, the Internet provider will 
be sold to homes near West- 
port and State Line roads. 

Google Fiber is a new In- 
ternet service by Google that 
promotes 100 to 1,000 times 
faster internet speed and con- 
nection. 

The service will drastically 
increase user bandwidth if it 
is in popular enough demand 
to spread to other cities and 
states. 



Purchase a T-shirt at the KSU Student 
Union or Varneys from September 17- 
26th as your ticket in! 



K 

v< 



/OLLEYB 

Sb If 



A L Ljjf 




7pm • October 3rd 
Ahearn Field House 



Women of 



Join the Women of K-State at 6pm for a 
pre-game event, including free pizza! 
Students: FREE with K-State ID 
Tickets Only $3 for the Women of K-State 
1. Visit kstatesports.com/grouptickets 
2. Enter the promo code: WOKS201 2 
3. Click on "IOWA STATE" 
RSVP to: 

k-state.edu/women/events/signup.html 

Save the Date: November 5th 
Women of K-State event 
Women's Basketball vs. Washburn 



Kansas State 

UNIVERSITY 



Continuing Education 



J. 800.221.CATS/// K-STATE SPORTS 



■COM